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Male pelvic pain specialist in London


Male pelvic pain specialist in London
Dr Fabio Castiglione Urologist

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Male pelvic pain specialist in London


Male Pelvic Pain syndrome (CPPS) is a condition that has been underdiagnosed and misunderstood. Some symptoms of CPPS are burning, pain or discomfort in the pelvic area, urination problems, sexual issues. Many men experience pain in the pelvic region and/or testes without any obvious cause. Assessing and treating men with chronic pelvic pain Treating CPPS (Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome) There are many treatments for male pelvic pain, but figuring out what's causing it can be tricky.



Chronic Prostististis specialist in London


A pelvic pain specialist is a doctor with special training in diagnosing and treating pelvic pain. Pelvic pain specialists are urologists, or doctors who specialize in the urinary tract. They can help you find a diagnosis and treatment plan if you are experiencing symptoms of pelvic pain.

  • Urologists specialize in male sexual health, bladder control problems (such as incontinence), prostate disorders, kidney stones and other urinary issues.

  • A urologist will take your medical history and perform a physical examination to determine the cause of your condition.

  • ITheymay recommend additional tests such as colonoscopy or ultrasound imaging of the abdomen/pelvis area (called cystoscopy). if necessary for proper diagnosis

Urologist, Genitourinary Medicine, Sexual and Reproductive Health.


A urologist is a doctor who specialises in the urinary tract, including the kidneys and bladder. They can help with urination problems, sexual issues and more.

A urologist may be able to treat your pelvic pain by:

  • Treating an infection (such as prostatitis).

  • Treating a blocked urine tube (urethra).

  • Inserting a device called a stent into your urethra if this has narrowed due to scarring or inflammation.

Expert in treating Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS)


Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a condition that affects many men, but it can be tricky to figure out what's causing it. CP/CPPS is a chronic inflammation of the prostate gland and surrounding tissues. You may have pain in your lower back, groin and pelvis or experience problems urinating (with or without burning peeing).


Some symptoms of CPPS are burning, pain or discomfort in the pelvic area, urination problems, sexual issues.

  • Pelvic pain

  • Burning

  • Pain or discomfort in the pelvic area

  • Urination problems

  • Sexual issues

Many men experience pain in the pelvic region and/or testes without any obvious cause.


Many men experience pain in the pelvic region and/or testes without any obvious cause. This is a common complaint, yet it has been underdiagnosed and misunderstood for years. It is estimated that up to 20% of men will suffer from chronic pelvic pain in their lifetime.

Pain experienced by men is often referred to as male pelvic pain syndrome (MPPS). MPPS can be debilitating, causing low self-esteem and depression among sufferers.


Male Pelvic Pain Syndrome (MPPS) is a condition that has been underdiagnosed and misunderstood.



Men's pelvic pain syndrome is a condition that has been underdiagnosed and misunderstood.

The condition affects men, causing them to experience symptoms such as:

  • Pain or discomfort in the groin area

  • Pain or discomfort during sex

  • Pain or discomfort during bowel movements

  • Urinary issues (such as burning when urinating)

Assessing and treating men with chronic pelvic pain


Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a non-specific condition that affects both men and women. It can be difficult to diagnose because there are several possible causes, but it can often be cured with the right treatment.

The first step to getting proper treatment is getting a diagnosis: if you have been diagnosed with chronic pelvic pain syndrome, your doctor will want to figure out what's causing it before prescribing treatments that may not work for you.

The main difference between chronic pelvic pain syndrome and prostatitis is that CPPS isn't caused by an infection of the prostate gland—it's caused by other factors such as muscle spasms or nerve damage around your pelvis area. The symptoms of these two conditions also differ greatly since they're not related; when someone has prostatitis, they'll usually experience painful urination accompanied by fever above 102 degrees Fahrenheit (39 degrees Celsius). On the other hand, someone with CPPS might experience lower back pain along with frequent urination at night or during exercise sessions


Treating CPPS (Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome)


Chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a medical condition that causes the patient to experience chronic or recurring pelvic pain, often accompanied by urinary symptoms. The most common cause of CPPS is prostatitis, an inflammation of your prostate gland. However, there are many other possible causes for this condition.

This condition can be difficult to diagnose because it does not always have clear symptoms and signs as other more common conditions do; thus it is often misdiagnosed and mistreated as such. It's important to work with a specialist who understands the complexities involved with CPPS treatment options so that you get effective treatment that works for you!


There are many treatments for male pelvic pain, but it can be tricky to figure out what's causing it.


It's important to assess the cause of your pelvic pain because there are many different types of conditions that can cause it. Some causes are treatable and some are not, so it's important to identify the underlying cause so you can be treated properly.


Get treatment for your CPPS


There are many treatment options for CPPS. These can help to relieve pain and discomfort, improve quality of life and prevent complications.

  • Medication - oral medications including antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen or diclofenac, or a combination of both. Topical ointments containing steroids may also be applied to affected areas. Some patients find these helpful in relieving symptoms while they wait for other treatments to work.

  • Pelvic floor muscle exercises - pelvic floor muscle exercises are recommended as the first line of treatment by NICE (the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). The exercises should be done twice a day for 20 minutes each time with breaks if needed. The aim is to strengthen the muscles surrounding your bladder so that they function better when you cough or sneeze etc., increasing their ability to maintain continence control after orgasm or ejaculation

  • Pain relief techniques - techniques such as biofeedback have been shown to be effective at reducing pain associated with CPPS

Conclusion

Many men experience pain in the pelvic region and/or testes without any obvious cause. Male Pelvic Pain syndrome (MPPS) is a condition that has been under diagnosed and misunderstood. Assessing and treating men with chronic pelvic pain Treating CPPS (Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome). There are many treatments for male pelvic pain, but it can be tricky to figure out what's causing it.

For more info click on : https://urologistandandrologistlondon.com/male-pelvic-pain-clinic/ Holistic Andrology is the first regenerative Andrology Clinic in London to use a scientific, holistic and non-invasive programme to treat male infertility and sexual problems such as erectile dysfunction (ED), Peyronie's disease, low testosterone and chronic prostatitis (pelvic pain).

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